Cinema

Blogs about cinema

Arnold Schwarzenegger in 2015

Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger was born on July 30, 1947 in Thal, Austria. Driven by his father, Arnold Schwarzenegger started practicing various sports since his childhood and when he was 14 years old he started practicing bodybuilding but also powerlifting. After a few years he started winning titles in the field of bodybuilding up to the first of seven titles of Mr. Olympia in 1970.

After some roles in movie productions and in some TV shows, Arnold Schwarzenegger gained great success as the protagonist of the 1982 film “Conan the Barbarian”. The film had a sequel in 1984, “Conan the Destroyer”. The great success was repeated again in 1984 playing the cyborg in the movie “Terminator” after director James Cameron initially cast him to interpret Kyle Reese. Despite the limited budget, success resulted in the creation of a franchise with various sequels and a TV show.

In 2003 Arnold Schwarzenegger temporarily withdrew from the scenes when he won the California election becoming the state governor. Arnold Schwarzenegger changed the world of bodybuilding and with some iconic roles has become a big movie star. He has some movie projects under development, including reprising the role as Conan that has contributed so much to his fame.

The poster for the documentary Tomorrow

The documentary “Tomorrow” (“Demain”), directed by Cyril Dion and Mélanie Laurent, was released in 2015. It won the César Award as the Best Documentary.

“Tomorrow” is divided into five chapters: agriculture, energy, economy, democracy and education. This means that it addresses not only the challenges directly affecting the environment and sustainability but also everything around it and regulates human beings’ lives in civil society. From this point of view, it tires to offer a fairly complete view of what’s waiting for us in the coming decades and how our society could evolve.

Stephen Furst in 2014

The news came that actor Stephen Furst died on June 16 following complications related to the diabetes he had long been suffering from.

After starting his acting career with some small roles, Stephen Furst was cast to play Kent “Flounder” Dorfman in the movie “National Lampoon’s Animal House”, a role he remained famous for also because he reprised it in the tV show “Delta House”.

During the 1980s, Stephen Furst had many roles in both cinema and television productions and lent his moice to animated shows’ characters. In 1994 he started playing another of the roles he remained famous for, Vir Cotto in the TV show “Babylon 5”.

Stephen Furst was active as a spokeswoman for the American Diabetes Association and spreading useful tips and recipes to keep diabetes under control. For years he used his fame to help other people suffering from same disease, unfortunately for him his problems turned out to be too serious. He’s survived by his wife Lorraine, their sons Nathan and Griff and a lot of fans who appreciated him as an actor.

George Takei in 2015

George Hosato Takei was born on April 20, 1937 in Los Angeles, California, USA. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, his family was sent to an internment camp for Japanese-Americans and until the end of World War II they lived in some of them.

In 1966, George Takei started playing the role he’s famous for, Hikaru Sulu in “Star Trek”. He also played an important role in the 1968 movie “The Green Berets” but this prevented him from being a regular presence in “Star Trek”. His role at the Enterprise helm was taken by Pavel Chekov, played by Walter Koenig. The two actors ended up having to share one dressing room but this led them to become friends.

Robert Bloch in 1976

Robert Albert Bloch was born on April 5, 1917 in Chicago, Illinois, USA.

In 1934, Bloch published the story “Lilies” on the semi-professional magazine “Marvel Tales”. After a few months, he started publishing his stories on “Weird Tales” as well. His first stories were strongly influenced by H.P. Lovecraft, so much that a part of them was set in the fictional universe of the so-called “Cthulhu Mythos”. Lovecraft’s death deeply marked Bloch, who gradually shifted his efforts toward different stories and also into science fiction.

In the ’50s, the Robert Bloch’s activity continued both in the literary field and in radio and was further expanded when he started working for television productions. The skills he had acquired in moving from one genre to another was seen in 1959, when he won the Hugo Award for the best science fiction short story with “That Hell-Bound Train” and he published the thriller / horror novel “Psycho”, which won the Edgar Allan Poe Award. The novel gave him great fame among the general public following its adaptation into the famous movie directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

Robert Bloch died on September 23, 1994. He left a legacy of dozens of novels, screenplays and short stories of various genres. During his life he received many important awards that show the importance of this author in the field of literature, cinema and television.