Horror

Captain Francis Crozier (Jared Harris) in Gore (Image courtesy AMC Studios / Amazon. All rights reserved)

“Gore” is the second episode of the TV show “The Terror”, an adapatation of a novel by Dan Simmons with the same title, and follows “Go for Broke”.

Note. This article contains spoilers about “Gore”.

The crews of the British ships HMS Erebus and HMS Terror spent a winter stuck in the Arctic ice. When the good weather arrives, Captain John Franklin (Ciarán Hinds) sends scouting teams in hopes of finding ice-free waters. One of the teams meets something else.

Captain John Franklin (Ciarán Hinds) in Go for Broke (Image courtesy AMC Studios / Amazon. All rights reserved)

“Go for Broke” is the pilot episode of the TV show “The Terror”, an adapatation of a novel by Dan Simmons with the same title. It’s broadcast in the USA on AMC Studios and in other nations on Amazon Prime Video.

In 1846 the British ships HMS Erebus and HMS Terror are on an expedition that aims to be the first to cross the last section of the northwest passage. However, there are many pitfalls in the Arctic and the sailors begin to die for causes to ascertain.

Edward Hamilton Waldo, this is his birth name, was born on February 26, 1918 in New York, USA. His parents divorced when he was still a child, his mother remarried to William Sturgeon and he took his surname also changing his personal name, hence becoming legally Theodore Sturgeon.

In 1950 Theodore Sturgeon published his first novel, “The Dreaming Jewels”, also known as “The Synthetic Man”, first in the magazine “Fantastic Adventures” and later in a revised version as a book. In 1953 Theodore Sturgeon published his second novel, “More Than Human”, obtained fixing-up three previously published stories. These are the novels considered his masterpieces, in which he develops at best some elements typical of his works with misfit protagonists.

Theodore Sturgeon lived for several years in Springfield, Oregon, where he died on May 8, 1985 of pulmonary fibrosis. He left a mark in the field of science fiction with stories in which he explores his characters’ humanity in various ways. He’s also known for the law that bears his name that states that Ninety percent of [science fiction] is crud, but then, ninety percent of everything is crud”.

John Carpenter in 2010

John Howard Carpenter was born on January 16, 1948 in Carthage, New York, USA. He’s been the director of a number of movies that sometimes had little commercial success but in time became cult movies such as “Dark Star”, “Halloween”, “The Fog”, “Escape from New York”, “The Thing”, “Big Trouble in Little China”, “Prince of Darkness”, and “They Live”.

Stephen King in 2007

Stephen Edwin King was born on September 21, 1947 in Portland, Maine, USA.

In 1974 Stephen King published his first novel, “Carrie”, which had little success with only 13,000 copies sold in its hardback edition but then surpassed the million copies sold in the first year in its paperback edition. The novel was adapted for cinema for the first time in 1976, followed by a king of sequel in 1999 and two further adaptations, one in 2002 and one in 2013.

On June 19, 1999, Stephen King was seriously injured after being hit by a minivan. The writer was forced to limit his activity for some time but over the years he still managed to publish various novels, including “Blaze” written in the 1970s but remained unpublished for a long time, which was published under the pen name Richard Bachman in 2007.

In recent years, Stephen King has resumed writing steadfastly, for example the Mr. Mercedes trilogy. In the first phase of his career he was snubbed but over time even critics got convinced by Stephen King’s works’ literary value so today he’s considered much more than the king of horror but simply a great writer.