Simulations

Blogs about simulations and virtual reality

Screenshot from an IllustrisTNG simulation (Image courtesy IllustrisTNG project)

An article published in the journal “Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology” presents the complete public release of the simulations coded as TNG100 and TNG300 of the IllustrisTNG project, a highly sophisticated simulation of the universe that has been improved over years of work. A team of researchers kept on improving its details and functionalities also by developing new interaction and exploration 2D and 3D tools to simulate two cubes of space of 100 and 300 million parsec side length.

The Hi-SEAS V mission crew (Photo courtesy Hi-SEAS)

Sunday, September 17, 2017 the Hi-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) V mission ended. It’s a simulation of a Mars mission conducted on the slopes of the volcano Mauna Loa. Six people spent 8 months in conditions similar to those the astronauts would face on Mars with a dome-shaped habitat as their home.

The Hi-SEAS IV mission's crew member coming out of their habitat (Photo courtesy University of Hawaii)

Sunday, August 28, 2016 the Hi-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) IV mission ended. It’s a simulation of a Mars mission conducted on the slopes of the volcano Mauna Loa. Six people spent a year in conditions similar to those the astronauts would face on Mars with a dome-shaped habitat as their home.

Fossil of Tribrachidium heraldicum

An article published in the journal “Science Advances” describes a computer simulation carried out to better understand how to eat the Tribrachidium Heraldicum (photo ¬©Aleksey Nagovitsyn), a creature that lived about 555 million years ago. The results reveal that in such an ancient time there was already a complex ecosystem formed by the first complex organisms greater than previously thought.

Simulation of the structure and motion of a phosphoglycerate kinase protein (Image courtesy Thomas Splettstoesser; http://www.scistyle.com all rights reserved)

An article published in the journal “Nature Physics” describes the results obtained with a series of simulations conducted using supercomputers at the Department of Energy of the USA’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The object of these sophisticated simulations were proteins to understand their motion, a key element in the functional, structural and regulatory roles they have in living organisms.