Dinosaurs

Blogs about dinosaurs

Skeleton of the probable T. rex nicknamed Jane (Photo courtesy Zissoudisctrucker)

An article published in the journal “Science Advances” reports a study that offers an analysis of the fossils of what was classified as Nanotyrannus offering evidence that actually they’re young specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex. A team of researchers led by Dr. Holly Woodward of the Oklahoma State University Center for Health Science conducted a paleohistological examination on bone fragments of the specimens nicknamed Jane and Petey concluding that fibers and other microstructures were growing. According to their estimates, Jane was around 13 years old at the time of death while Petey was around 15 years old.

A skull of the herbivorous dinosaur called Styracosaurus albertensis shows that it had asymmetrical horns

An article published in the journal “Cretaceous Research” reports a study of a fossil skull of Styracosaurus albertensis, a herbivorous dinosaur that lived in today’s North America about 75 million years ago, in the Cretaceous period. A team of researchers led by Professor Robert Holmes of the University of Alberta, Canada, examined this well-preserved fossil noting that its horns were asymmetrical. Previously, no skull attributed to the genus Styracosaurus was complete enough to see that asymmetry. This discovery could lead to various reclassifications of fossils that over time were attributed to other species of the genus Styracosaurus and later even to other genera.

Reconstruction of Siamraptor suwati with the bones available (Image courtesy Chokchaloemwong et al, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0222489)

An article published in the journal “PLOS ONE” reports the identification of a new species of dinosaur that lived in today’s Thailand around 120 million years ago, in the Cretaceous period, which was named Siamraptor suwati. It belongs to the group of carcharodontosaurian, in turn part of the larger group of allosaurs, carnivorous dinosaurs that were super-predators in their ecosystems. This new species, like its closest relatives, had teeth similar to those of sharks and can provide information on the global spread of these dinosaurs.

A stiff skull behind the powerful bite of Tyrannosaurus rex

An article published in the journal “The Anatomical Record” reports a study of the anatomy of Tyrannosaurus rex’s skull which offers an explanation of how it could have bite so powerful that it could crush of its prey’s bones without breaking its own bones. A team of researchers led by Ian Cost of Albright College examined the characteristics of the T. Rex skull also using computer simulations concluding that it was as stiff as those of modern hyenas and crocodiles and not as flexible as those of snakes and birds.

Kamuysaurus japonicus was a duck-billed dinosaur that lived 72 million years ago

An article published in the journal “Scientific Reports” describes the identification of a new species of duck-billed dinosaur that lived about 72 million years ago, in the Late Cretaceous period, in today’s Japan. A team of paleontologists led by Professor Yoshitsugu Kobayashi of the Japanese Hokkaido University Museum named it Kamuysaurus japonicus and classified in the family of hadrosaurids after examining the almost complete skeleton available.